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Press Releases

ATLANTA (JULY 21, 2015)— The Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) has received a $50,000 donation from former LBDA board member, Tamara Real, in honor of her husband who passed away from Lewy body dementia (LBD).  The “Carl Rinne LBD Research Fund” will be used to help LBDA establish itself as the recognized center point for LBD research in the US.

The Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) mourns the passing of a special friend, Dorothy “Dottie” Mangurian.  The inspiration for the Harry T. Mangurian Jr. Foundation’s visionary commitment to the cause of Lewy body dementia (LBD), she died in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on March 28, 2015 after a 15-year battle with LBD. 

The sad news of hockey legend Stan Mikita’s illness has brought unexpected visibility to a disease unfamiliar to many people. The Lewy Body Dementia Association offers its support to the family, friends and fans of Stan Mikita. Mr. Mikita’s family announced today he has been diagnosed with suspected Lewy body dementia (LBD), one of the most debilitating forms of dementia. LBD affects 1.4 million Americans. 

ATLANTA (December 19, 2014) — Lewy body dementia (LBD) — a complex, challenging and surprisingly common brain disease — is often misdiagnosed as its “cousin,” Alzheimer’s disease.  And that could lead to devastating results.

ATLANTA (November 25, 2014) The recent news that the brain of actor/comedian Robin Williams showed signs of diffuse Lewy body disease has created more interest and coverage in this widely under-diagnosed condition than ever before. However, it can be difficult for the lay person to understand this complicated disease, and the Lewy Body Dementia Association offers information to clarify the confusion.

ATLANTA (November 10, 2014) — The recent release of the autopsy and coroner reports on Robin Williams has raised questions about his state of health at the time of his tragic suicide earlier this year.  Some news reports indicate that Mr. Williams had dementia at the time of his death. The Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) provides information about what can – and cannot – be concluded from these reports.

ATLANTA (OCTOBER 14, 2014)— In honor of Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) Awareness Month, the Lewy Body Dementia Association proudly unveils, “The Profiles of LBD,” a portrait series of families living with the disease. Taken by world-renowned professional photographer, Robert Whitman, the series encapsulates the love between those afflicted with LBD and their caregivers, despite the struggles they face together every day managing a relatively unknown, yet very common, form of dementia.  Following Alzheimer’s disease, LBD is the second most common cause of progressive dementia, affecting 1.4 million Americans. 

ATLANTA (OCTOBER 1, 2014)— In an effort to drive awareness of a common but little known dementia, Lewy body dementia (LBD) families are hosting events nationwide to help raise support for those affected by the disease.  Greater public awareness is desperately needed, as LBD is the most misdiagnosed form of dementia.  LBD already affects approximately 1.4 million Americans, a number expected to grow with our aging population, and is the second most common cause of progressive dementia after Alzheimer’s disease.  With symptoms resembling both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, getting an LBD diagnosis takes an average of 18 months and visits to three different doctors.

ATLANTA (SEPTEMBER 22, 2014)—Have you ever wondered what life would be like if you suffered from dementia other than Alzheimer’s disease? Wonder no more. The Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA), today, unveils what might be a typical day in the life for caregivers and their loved ones who suffer with Lewy body dementia (LBD), a complex, challenging, and surprisingly common brain disease. LBD families have unique challenges that differ from Alzheimer’s, and awareness is needed by healthcare professionals and the general public to better support them.

The second most common cause of progressive dementia, yet the most misdiagnosed

ATLANTA (AUGUST 19, 2014)—Today, the Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) steps up its awareness and fundraising effort “Lewy Who?” to put the brakes on Lewy body dementia (LBD). With symptoms that resemble both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, LBD is the most misdiagnosed form of dementia. Yet, following Alzheimer’s disease, it is the second most common cause of progressive dementia, affecting 1.3 million Americans. Families can fight this debilitating disease while educating others about LBD. LBDA offers five (5) ways to fight: (1) donate, (2) employer matching gifts, (3) plan a community event, (4) volunteer, or (5) partner with LBDA.