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Press Releases

ATLANTA (November 25, 2014) The recent news that the brain of actor/comedian Robin Williams showed signs of diffuse Lewy body disease has created more interest and coverage in this widely under-diagnosed condition than ever before. However, it can be difficult for the lay person to understand this complicated disease, and the Lewy Body Dementia Association offers information to clarify the confusion.

ATLANTA (November 10, 2014) — The recent release of the autopsy and coroner reports on Robin Williams has raised questions about his state of health at the time of his tragic suicide earlier this year.  Some news reports indicate that Mr. Williams had dementia at the time of his death. The Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) provides information about what can – and cannot – be concluded from these reports.

ATLANTA (OCTOBER 14, 2014)— In honor of Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) Awareness Month, the Lewy Body Dementia Association proudly unveils, “The Profiles of LBD,” a portrait series of families living with the disease. Taken by world-renowned professional photographer, Robert Whitman, the series encapsulates the love between those afflicted with LBD and their caregivers, despite the struggles they face together every day managing a relatively unknown, yet very common, form of dementia.  Following Alzheimer’s disease, LBD is the second most common cause of progressive dementia, affecting 1.4 million Americans. 

ATLANTA (OCTOBER 1, 2014)— In an effort to drive awareness of a common but little known dementia, Lewy body dementia (LBD) families are hosting events nationwide to help raise support for those affected by the disease.  Greater public awareness is desperately needed, as LBD is the most misdiagnosed form of dementia.  LBD already affects approximately 1.4 million Americans, a number expected to grow with our aging population, and is the second most common cause of progressive dementia after Alzheimer’s disease.  With symptoms resembling both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, getting an LBD diagnosis takes an average of 18 months and visits to three different doctors.

ATLANTA (SEPTEMBER 22, 2014)—Have you ever wondered what life would be like if you suffered from dementia other than Alzheimer’s disease? Wonder no more. The Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA), today, unveils what might be a typical day in the life for caregivers and their loved ones who suffer with Lewy body dementia (LBD), a complex, challenging, and surprisingly common brain disease. LBD families have unique challenges that differ from Alzheimer’s, and awareness is needed by healthcare professionals and the general public to better support them.

The second most common cause of progressive dementia, yet the most misdiagnosed

ATLANTA (AUGUST 19, 2014)—Today, the Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) steps up its awareness and fundraising effort “Lewy Who?” to put the brakes on Lewy body dementia (LBD). With symptoms that resemble both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, LBD is the most misdiagnosed form of dementia. Yet, following Alzheimer’s disease, it is the second most common cause of progressive dementia, affecting 1.3 million Americans. Families can fight this debilitating disease while educating others about LBD. LBDA offers five (5) ways to fight: (1) donate, (2) employer matching gifts, (3) plan a community event, (4) volunteer, or (5) partner with LBDA.

The second most common cause of progressive dementia, yet the most misdiagnosed

ATLANTA (AUGUST 7, 2014)— Lewy body dementia (LBD) is the most misdiagnosed form of dementia, taking on average more than 18 months and three doctors to receive a correct diagnosis. Even though it is second only to Alzheimer’s disease as the most common cause of progressive dementia, affecting 1.3 million Americans, the symptoms of LBD are not well recognized by many physicians, especially primary care physicians and other general practitioners. Unfortunately, then, most people are not diagnosed until they are at moderate or severe states, leaving their caregivers unprepared and the patient vulnerable to potentially deadly medication side effects.

LBDA Offers Answers and Support for One of the Most Debilitating Dementias

ATLANTA (JULY 21, 2014)—“I watched my husband experience a decline in cognition followed by a period of what seemed like improved function only to plunge again into confusion with more frequent hallucinations,” says one caregiver newly acquainted with Lewy body dementia (LBD).  According to the Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA), these ups and downs in function are sometimes refer to by family caregivers as the “roller-coaster effect” of LBD.  Fluctuating levels of cognitive ability, attention and alertness are one of the core features of LBD. 

 The Difference in Diagnosis May Mean Life or Death 

ATLANTA (JULY 7, 2014)—Today, the Lewy Body Dementia Association (LBDA) highlights the importance of an accurate Lewy body dementia diagnosis, which may have life-saving implications.  Affecting more than 1.3 million Americans, Lewy body dementia (LBD) is the most misdiagnosed form of dementia and, following Alzheimer’s disease, is the second most common cause of progressive dementia.   LBD is associated with abnormal protein deposits in the brain, called Lewy bodies, that affect thinking, movement, behavior and mood.  It’s difficult to diagnose LBD, because its early symptoms resemble those found in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

 Legendary Radio Personality Was Diagnosed With LBD 

ATLANTA (JUNE 18, 2014)—The sad news of Casey Kasem’s illness and passing has brought unexpected visibility to a disease unfamiliar to many people. The Lewy Body Dementia Association offers its condolences to the family and friends of Casey Kasem.  Mr. Kasem had been suffering from Lewy body dementia (LBD), one of the most debilitating forms of dementia. LBD affects 1.3 million Americans.